Wednesday, August 24, 2016

A family Trip to Coorg - Part 4


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Dubare


Dubare Elephant Camp

After lunch, we proceeded towards Dubare to see the Elephant Camp, located on the banks of River Cauvery, in Kushalnagar. 

To reach there, we had to go on a  boat ride through the clean water, which was really cheap (Rs.30/- per head).  It was a small ride and hardly 5 minutes only.  As soon as we reached there, the boat people approached us and we had to wait for some more people to board it. They have a requirement of 20 people to take the ride.   Sometimes it may take more than an hour to get a boat in crowded time. When we reached it was not so crowded and within minutes, more people joined there, (some of them we had already met in other tourist places there) and it was a fun ride, to reach across the elephant camp in Dubare Forest.



We saw a number of elephants there including small ones.  The elephants  were well tamed and friendly. The tourists enjoyed feeding them, watching them having their bath, and the elephants played with us, by splashing water. There were other facilities like elephant ride, jungle lodges and river rafting.









            




                                                Some juice and snacks were available here. 



Distance from Mysore - 88 kms
Distance from Bangalore - 250 kms
Distance from Kushalnagar centre - 10 kms


After spending some time in the elephant camp, we waited for the boat for our return trip. Within minutes a boat came and took us back to the spot where we had boarded the boat. 

Soon we were back in the taxi, and the driver drove us to Nisargadhama, which is a small island about 3 kms away from Kushalnagar.  I will write about it in another blog. 




Saturday, August 20, 2016

A Family Trip to Coorg - Part 3

Back to Part 2



Abby Falls

After parking the car on the road, we walked about 800 meters through a narrow path of the private plantation of coffee bushes, wild vines and creepers.  Though the path was a little slippery, both young and old alike, walked through the narrow passage with excitement to see the fall.. It was worth the visit. 





 After a few minutes walk, we could hear the sounds of the falls which became louder as we approached the spot, after passing through a lush and dense greenery. The waterfall was magnificent and flowing in full force. Any one who loves nature should not miss this marvelous and gushing water flow.  


One must walk through the hanging bridge to get a good view of the fall, which is a sight to remember. The water fall comes down from a height of 70 feet The waters join River Cauvery.  The cascading crystal clear water in the midst of emerald flora is a delight to the eyes.  





Our driver, who was a frequent visitor to this place, had warned us to watch out for leeches, and not to be in close proximity of the fence. 

Earlier it was called as Jessi Falls by the British, in the memory of the daughter of Medikere's first British Captain.

Best time to visit - July to October.
Distance from Medikere - 8 kms.
Distance from Mysore - 122 kms
Distance from Bangalore - 270 kms

There was one more fall named Iruppu Falls, which is supposed to be bigger than this, and further away, but we had no time to visit there, and we were content with Abbey Falls.


Thursday, August 18, 2016

A Family Trip to Coorg, India - Part 2

A Family Trip to Coorg, India - Part 1

Talacauvery

Talacauvery, the source of River Cauvery, is located about 4187 feet above sea level, situated on the Brahmagiri hill slopes. Passing through the zigzag roads on either sides, enjoying the natural beauty of coffee plantations, interspersed with pepper vines, and banana and cardamom crops, when we reached the spot mild shower welcomed us, but soon it cleared off, and became foggy. After a while the fog too disappeared.   






According to legend, saint Kavera meditated at Sahyadri hills to please God to bless him with a child.  Lord Brahma was pleased and blessed him with an adopted daughter Cauvery. The saint brought up the adopted daughter with much love and care.  Saint Agasthya, who was a frequent visitor to Kavera's ashram, fell in love with her and married her.  After some time, the saint fell in love with Kannike, whom he met secretly. Cauvery came to know about it and she went down angrily flowing taking Kannike along with her. When she came down, the force of the water was such that it pushed the pleats of the sarees of the Coorgi women who were waiting for her, from the front to the rear. It is said that since then the Coorgi women drape the sari in that way, the pleats are tucked in at the waist at the back rather than in front, as commonly seen in most part of India. (Sorry, I didn't take a photo of a Kodava woman). 





Cauvery River originates as a spring feeding the tank and the water is said to flow underground to emerge as a river. 



On the day of Thulasankramana (the first day of Tula month which usually falls on 17th or 18th of October) the water gushes up from the spring at a predetermined moment, and people throng this place to witness this wonderful phenomenon. 









There are a series of steps (about 370) leading to the top of Brahmahiri Hill, and from there one can see 360 degree view of the surrounding area. 



Distance from Bangalore to Talacauvery - 297 kms via NH 275

Distance from Mysore to Talacauvery - 160 kms.  


From there, after having a delicious Coorgi lunch in a hotel on the way, we headed to see Abby Waterfalls, which was about 48 kms away.  




Monday, August 15, 2016

A Family Trip to Coorg, India - Part 1

Nestled in the Western Ghats, amidst verdant valleys, imposing mountains and dense forests, Coorg is a great place to visit for a rejuvenating holiday.  

Recently, we had planned an outstation trip for the family.  We hired a taxi from Bangalore and headed towards Coorg, one of the best hill stations of South India.  Coorg is also called as Kodagu, and nicknamed as ‘Kashmir of South’ , ‘Switzerland of India’ and ‘Scotland of India’.  

River Cauvery (Kaveri River) is the life line of Karnataka State and Talacauvery is the birth place of this river, which is located in Coorg.  Talacauvery is  a famous pilgrimage centre for Hindus, located at the feet of Brahmagiri Hills. The main crops of Coorg are Coffee, Pepper and Cardamom.  You can also get the tastiest honey in the world in this picturesque place.


We had already booked our accommodation in a Home Stay named Chili Pili in Hoskeri village at Medikere.  After a drive of about 240 kms  we reached the Chili Pili estate, owned by  Mr. and Mrs. Dilip Ganapathy.  Fortunately, the weather was very favourable;  it was not raining during our trip and thus we had a pleasant drive. When we arrived at the Homestay, they were waiting for us with their delicious dinner.   We had booked two rooms for our family, and soon retired to the cozy rooms.   (More about the Homestay will be posted later. )


After a wonderful breakfast  in the morning in the Homestay,  we set off for our sight-seeing trip, with the directions provided by Mr. Ganapathy.   


Our first visit was to Sri Bhagadeshwara  Temple at Bhagamandala, dedicated to Lord Shiva.  The other deities in the temple are Mahavishnu, Ganapathy and  Subramanya.

The view from there was stunning. Bhagamandala is a popular tourist destination and it is the confluence of three rivers, Sujyothi, Kanike and Cauvery. The temple is named after Sage Bhaganda, who installed Shivlinga at this holy place. 









Then we headed towards  Talacauvery, the origin of River Cauvery.  It was about 5 kms from here. More about it in the next posting.




Thursday, August 4, 2016

8 Tips for Book Reading

Recently I happened to read a couple of books during my long stay in London.  Some book reading quotes are given here. 


1. If you only read the books that everyone else is reading, you can only think what everyone else is thinking.  
–Haruki Murakami
2. Any book that helps a child to form a habit of reading, to make reading one of his deep and continuing needs, is good for him.
–Maya Angelou
3. A book is a version of the world. If you do not like it, ignore it or offer your own version in return.
–Salman Rushdie
4. A book is the only place in which you can examine a fragile thought without breaking it.
–Edward P. Morgan
5. The only important thing in a book is the meaning that it has for you.
–W. Somerset Maugham
6. A great book should leave you with many experiences, and slightly exhausted at the end. You live several lives while reading.
–William Styron
7. You know you’ve read a good book when you turn the last page and feel a little as if you have lost a friend.
–Paul Sweeney
8. Whenever you read a good book, somewhere in the world a door opens to allow in more light.
  –Vera Nazarian