Skip to main content

Revisiting Shoranur in Palakkad, Kerala


Recently, I had attended our annual "Kudumba Sangamam" (family reunion) in my native place in Kerala. The place was Mundakkottukurissi at Shoranur. The function was attended by more than 100 family members, who had come from different parts. This time I had spent a little more time in this village and I was able to attend some important functions and visit many relatives and places. Visiting some of the temples was a great experience which brought me some nostalgic memories of my childhood and adolescent days.

Kunnathu kavu, Mundakkottukurissi


We used to visit this temple regularly as a part of our family rituals and light deepas for chuttuvilakku (lighting deepams around the temple). As kids, we used to wait eagerly for Uchar Vela, the pooram festival of the temple, to see the colorful chariots of our own village and the chariots coming from other nearby villages, for this event. We used to dress in our best attires, to compete to take the thalapoli, (arathi) to welcome them. This festival is celebrated on a particular day of the year, which usually falls between 15th January-15th February, as per the star.

Paddy field


In the earlier days, harvesting of the field, was performed by the womenfolk of the village, cutting the paddy yield and bringing them on their heads, which used to last for a week or more. Now this job is taken over by the machines and would be finished within an hour or so. The paths for walking through the fields were very narrow, not more than two feet in width. As kids, it was fun for us chatting while walking on the narrow paths without dancing and falling down to the fields, holding the school bag and an umbrella. Without expertise, one wouldn't have been able to walk on these paths, especially during rainy season.

Kayiliad Kavu, Kayiliyad

This was another temple where we used to visit only once or twice a year. The womenfolk in groups, used to go there with the required ingredients and vessel and cook payasam there, using firewood. I used to accompany my mother. The Payasam, (a rice pudding cooked with jaggery and added coconuts scrappings) was the nivedhyam to offer the deity, following a pooja there. After the pooja, the devotees can take the payasam home. This was usually performed once a year, during the month of the main festival of the temple.

The main festival was called Pooram. Then on the main Pooram festival day people from the same village and the nearby villages, come to see and enjoy it. During that festival night, Pava Koothu (Puppet show), a traditional art form of Kerala, was also played in the Koothu Madam in front of the deity, Bhagavathy. The performance starts at about 10 p.m. and goes on till day-break. Those days it used to be a popular entertainment for the public.

Other attractions include the colorful chariots and well decorated kalas (oxen) made out of hay and clothes, called kalavela (( check a sample here ) -

Also watch this video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aVwO-tPK_0M

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

My trip to Nagamangalam, Tamil Nadu

Recently I had an opportunity to visit Lourdes Matha church (Our Lady of Lourdes) at Nagamangalam in Tamil Nadu. Nagamangalam is a Village in Kelamangalam Taluk in Krishnagiri District of Tamil Nadu State. One of my friends wanted to visit there and asked me whether I can accompany her. I took it as a God given opportunity and agreed to accompany her. I immediately googled to collect more details about the place, but initially I didn't find much information. I hope this blog may be of help to those who wish to travel there. The Church is located in the beautiful J.G. Farm at St.Mary's Nagar. From the gate of the Farm it takes 1.5 kms to reach there.
Canteen We reached there at about 8.30 a.m. on a Saturday, without knowing the working time. After spending some time there we were about to return and by then people started coming in. So please check the timing of the Church before your visit at http://www.lourdesmatha.com/. The history of the church - copied from…

Happy Vishu 2016

Happy Vishu to all my friends. Vishu is an important festival of Kerala State (India) and it is celebrated as the New Year of the State, and even considered as an auspicious day. This regional New Year is celebrated in many other states of India too, but with different names. The year 2016 Vishu is a bit different to me. I am celebrating my Vishu with my daughter and family at London. My little grandson (6 plus) is highly enthralled to see the Vishukkani, early in the morning. He unusually was up from his bed earlier than his usual time and began to call me out. He wanted me to bring him with his eyes closed, to see the Vishukkani. After seeing the Vishukkani, I gave him vishukkaineetam and he was even more thrilled. He was eager to go and talk about it with his friends in the school. Though his mother used to keep Vishukkani every year, this year it was altogether a different experience to him. More about Vishu can be read here and here.

Kanchipuram Visit - Kailasanatha Temple

Back to Kanchipuram

We wanted to cover one or two temples in the evening of the same day we arrived at Kanchipuram. Our autorikshaw driver was only too glad to take us around. 

He first took us to Kanchi Kailasanatha temple located in the west of Kanchipuram.  He dropped us just in front of the temple. 
The temple has a high rising tower at the entrance.  The temple, built in Dravidian style architecture, is dedicated to Lord Shiva.  Built in 650 AD-705 AD, by the Pallavas, it is the oldest temple of Kanchipuram. Currently it is looked after by the Archeological Survey of India.   
Numerous carved images of Gods and Goddesses are seen on the inner and outer walls of the temple. One of the unique features of this temple is the 16 sided Shivalingam made up of black granite at the main shrine.  Since it was in the evening we could not capture photos properly. However, I am posting one photo which I actually took the next morning while passing that way. 

This is the only temple in Kancheepuram…