Friday, August 29, 2014

Happy Ganesha Festival 2014


Wish you all a very happy Ganesha Festival. This important festival is celebrated in all parts of India today, the 29th of August 2014. It is also known as Ganesh Chaturthi and Vinayaka Chaturthi. The festival to celebrate and glorify him is called Ganesh Chaturthi (Ganesha Festival and Vinayaka Chaturthi).

Lord Ganesha (also known as Lord Ganapati) is the Lord of Wisdom. He is the son of Lord Shiva and Goddess Parvathi. The elephant headed God is worshipped first in all the pujas performed by the Hindus. It is believed that He removes all the obstacles and evils on the way.

If you are interested to know more about Lord Ganesha please check this page.

Sunday, August 3, 2014

Book Tour: Incantation Paradox By Annamaria Bazzi


Blurb:

Magic is an illusion. It doesn’t really exist. Or does it?

A horrible car accident destroys Dolores Reynard’s life. But instead of waking up in a hospital bed, she awakens in a teenager’s body. Soon, she discovers she is at the heart of the murderous mystery surrounding the death of Mona, the young girl whose body she occupies. Caught between an evil greater than she ever imagined and a wizard who heals her tattered heart, she is forced to play a dangerous game of intrigue in the hopes of finding a way to return to her previous life.

Will magic be her ally, or will it lead to her demise once and for all.

About the Author Although born in the United States, Annamaria Bazzi spent a great deal of her childhood in Sicily, Italy, in a town called Sciacca. Italian was the language spoken at home. Therefore, she had no problems when she found herself growing up in a strange country. Upon returning to the states, she promised herself she would speak without an accent. She attended Wayne State University in Detroit Michigan, where she obtained her Bachelor of Science in Computers with a minor in Spanish. Annamaria spent twenty years programming systems for large corporations, creating innovative solution, and addressing customer problems. During those years, she raised four daughters and one husband. Annamaria lives in Richmond Virginia with her small family where she now dedicates a good part of her day writing.

My interview Annamaria:

1.What inspired you to write this book?
This book was inspired by a moment of craziness. Have you ever gotten out of bed from the wrong side? I did that morning, and my entire day resemble Dr. Suess’s Wacky Wednesday. That morning when I sat at my computer I sent an email to a good friend telling him, ‘this morning when I looked in the mirror I saw my younger self’. He takes everything literally and seriously. The back and forth of emails made me thing of Freaky Friday, the movie by Walt Disney featuring Lindsay Lohan and Jamie Lee Curtis. Why not, I thought, audiences seem to love the switching body syndrome. That’s how the idea was born, on a crazy, wacky morning.

2. How did you come up with the title?
The original title of the book was Trapped in a Nightmare, but when I googled it, I found another book with this title. I wanted mine to be unique. Although I have the creative juices to write a novel, I didn’t seem to be gifted in the department of title choosing. I asked friends if they had any ideas and Michael came up with Incantation Paradox.

3. What was your first published work? How did you feel about it when it was published?
The first works I published were two short stories, A Simple Matter of Justice, a paranormal short who was brutally murdered, and Revelation of Abaddon, a paranormal romance. Publishing the first work was like experience the biggest high ever, like walking on cloud nine and never wanting to come back down.

4. What are the challenges you faced while writing this current book?
At times, it was difficult to reconcile the feeling of the woman stuck in the teen body with all the young hormones cursing through it.

5. What form of marketing works best for promoting your work(s)?
I’m still new at this and haven’t really found the best way to promote my works. But, I have realized that reviews sell books. The more positive reviews a book has the more sales it has.

6. What is your preferred time and place to write?
I love my great room—kitchen, breakfast nook, and family room, a nice 30-foot long room. I sit at the table, turn the ceiling fan on and I’m good to go.

7. Where do you get your ideas?
A great many of my ideas come from the desire to fix world problems in a way that make sense to me. All too often, events around the world, especially political, don’t make sense. I take these problems and place them in a fictional world so I can solve them in a way that satisfies my need for both justice and order.

8. Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
I have a few authors I admire and love reading, Orson Scott Card, Terry Goodkind, and Frank Herbert. These are the authors that have shaped who I am as a writer. Although I must admit that in some ways Jane Austen as also influenced me. I do believe my novels all have a dash of romance because of her.

9. Do you write daily, and if so, approximately how many words? Or only when the mood strikes?
I do try to write daily, although sometimes it proves impossible. I don’t necessarily write on my novel since I have two blogs I maintain and I’m constantly interviewing authors for my Round Table Chat, one of the features on my blog, annamaria’s writing corner.

10. What are you working on now?
At this time, I’m working on a collection of short stories that take place in the after math of a world disaster that destroys most of the world. It’s the stories of some of the survivors and how they cope in their new reality.

11. Have you felt any special moment in your writing career, which made you feel worth your struggle of writing?
I’ve fallen in love with reading and writing at the age of eight and have always thought the struggles are worth it. My goal has always been to make kids and teens read. If I bring even just one of these none readers to start enjoy books, I’ve accomplished my goal.

12. Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
The only thing I can say to my readers is I hope you enjoy the story I create for your enjoyment and I thank you for your support and for reading my novels. I do love hearing from you so stop by my website if you want to talk about my novels and if you want to discover new authors stop by my blog, annamaria’s writing corner.

You can visit Annamaria at:

blog http://annamariabazzi.com
website http://www.annamariasbooks.com
facebook page https://www.facebook.com/Author.annamariabazzi
email annamariascorner@yahoo.com
twitter https://twitter.com/AMBazzi
goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6890526.Annamaria_Bazzi
Check in on Kendíka’s facebook page https://www.facebook.com/kendika.burkeshire

Giveaway

2 Digital Copies of Incantation Paradox is up for grabs.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Universal Link to your amazon book


Do you use a universal link for the promotion of your kindle books? I was not, but hereafter I'm going to use it.

Many times we post links of our books on our websites or for twitter promotion with just about one store link. i.e amazon.com or amazon.in etc. If we post links like this, some smart ones may change it to buy from their country's site. Others may not even check it, thinking that it is not available in their country. Thus, you are likely to lose your potential customers from the other parts of the globe.

If you have made your kindle book available worldwide the best thing is to use a universal link, so that your potential customers worldwide can click on that link and they will be able to find the correct store available in their country.

How to make a universal link for your book in amazon?

Just use http://www.booklinker.net/ and then you can get your universal link.

It makes easier for the buyer to buy from their particular store.

Friday, July 11, 2014

Sweet & Sour-1


I was so thrilled to see that as I am writing this blog, my short story ebook Sweet & Sour-1 is ranked #311 in Amazon.in Best Sellers list. I know it won't stay there for long, and it will keep fluctuating. Still at least for some time it is nice to see it ranked there.

http://www.amazon.in/dp/B00IKFNAZY

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Leaving Reviews for Indie Authors


This post was originally appeared on Author S Smith.

You know that friend who’s always pleading harassing asking you to leave them a book review on Amazon? The one whose book you read? Possibly you even got the book for free? Okay, so ME for some of you.

This is just a little tutorial/explanation of why it is so important and how to do it. One more encouragement to get you over there, leave the review, and drop the guilt. :)

First of all, is one more review really important? YES! Unless the book has over 100 reviews, it’s important. And the author checks every day on occasion to see if there is a new review. And it really makes the author’s day to see a new review (unless it is 2 stars or less and then they feel kind of bummed).

I. WHY REVIEWS ARE IMPORTANT

1) When a potential buyer goes to an author’s book’s Amazon page,

Read the full post here.

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

10 Quotes of famous writers about writing


1. Most of the basic material a writer works with is acquired before the age of fifteen.
- Willa Cather

2. Most writers can write books faster than publishers can write checks.
- Richard Curtis

3. Writing is turning one's worst moments into money.
- J. P. Donleavy

4. Get it down. Take chances. It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

5. A novel must give a sense of permanence as well as a sense of life.
- E. M. Forster

6. Engrave this in your brain: EVERY WRITER GETS REJECTED. You will be no different.
- John Scalzi

7. The historian records, but the novelist creates.
- E. M. Forster

8. My aim is to put down what I see and what I feel in the best and simplest way I can tell it.
- Ernest Hemingway

9. All writers are vain, selfish and lazy, and at the very bottom of their motives lies a mystery. Writing a book is a long, exhausting struggle, like a long bout of some painful illness. One would never undertake such a thing if one were not driven by some demon whom one can neither resist nor understand.
- George Orwell

10. I am a part of all I have read.
- John Kieran

Sunday, May 18, 2014

Five Inspiring Quotes of William Faulkner


This week I am writing about the quotes of some of the famous authors.

William Faulkner, (1897-1962) - Some of his famous novels are The Sound and the Fury, As I lay Dying, Light in August, A Rose for Emily, Sanctuary etc and many Short Stories.

Faulkner won two Pulitzer Prizes for Fiction. In 1949, he won the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Five Quotes of William Faulkner

1. “Read, read, read. Read everything -- trash, classics, good and bad, and see how they do it. Just like a carpenter who works as an apprentice and studies the master. Read! You'll absorb it. Then write. If it's good, you'll find out. If it's not, throw it out of the window.”

2. “Never be afraid to raise your voice for honesty and truth and compassion against injustice and lying and greed. If people all over the world...would do this, it would change the earth.”

3. “A writer needs three things, experience, observation, and imagination, any two of which, at times any one of which, can supply the lack of the others.”

4. “Memory believes before knowing remembers. Believes longer than recollects, longer than knowing even wonders.”

5. "It's a shame that the only thing a man can do for eight hours a day is work. He can't eat for eight hours; he can't drink for eight hours; he can't make love for eight hours. The only thing a man can do for eight hours is work. ”

If you want to learn more about this great author please check this page.

Friday, April 25, 2014

Tips on Writing from John Steinbeck


As writers, we always would love to read the tips from great writers. We hope that some of their tips may be helpful to us in our own writing. Read about the Tips from John Steinbeck, Pulitzer Prize winner, Nobel laureate.
1.Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.

2.Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.

3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.

4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.

5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.

6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

If interested, check out some of his books -

The Grapes of Wrath - The Pulitzer Prize-winning epic was first published in 1939.

Cannery Row. First published in 1945, Cannery Row focuses on the acceptance of life as it is—both the exuberance of community and the loneliness of the individual. John Steinbeck draws on his memories of the real inhabitants of Monterey, California, and interweaves their stories in this world where only the fittest survive—creating what is at once one of his most humorous and poignant works.

East of Eden (Penguin Twentieth Century Classics) - Set in the rich farmland of California's Salinas Valley, this sprawling and often brutal novel follows the intertwined destinies of two families—the Trasks and the Hamiltons—whose generations helplessly reenact the fall of Adam and Eve and the poisonous rivalry of Cain and Abel. The masterpiece of Steinbeck’s later years, East of Eden is a work in which Steinbeck created his most mesmerizing characters and explored his most enduring themes.

Don't forget to check out more about him here.

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Book Review - Wise and Otherwise by Sudha Murthy


"Wise and Otherwise" is a collection of short stories authored by Sudha Murthy. They were drawn from the real life of people whom she came across in her life. That must be the reason each one is believable and come alive before you as the story unfolds.

In addition, the stories are gripping from the beginning, and make you turn the pages to know what happens next. (That is what I felt). Like her other books, this one also has a simple style. Though the stories are simple, they are powerful. Some of the stories make you think and some make you laugh. Though almost all the stories are good, some of them stand out in the crowd like An Old Man's Ageless Wisdom, A lesson in life from a beggar, and Think Positive, be Happy are some of them. The characters won't leave you there after finishing with it, but remain in your mind at least for a few days. Her ability to transform the simple life incidents of human value, which usually go unnoticed,into the eyes of the readers through her beautiful writing is praise-worthy.

When I finished reading the book, a friend of mine who was going through a bad phase of her life, asked me to recommend her a book to read, and I couldn't give it anything better than this book at that moment. At a later date, she thanked me for the timely and thoughtful gift.

After having said this, I know this book is not for everyone. However, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book, and some of them stayed with me for a while.